Torontoist Survey: Some Observations

A few observations on summary results to date of the Torontoist TTC survey:

It’s mostly the 34 and under crowd taking the survey. Some may interpret it to mean the college crowd or those who can’t afford cars crowd are the only ones answering the questions. That’s not necessarily the case because many in that age group will be working full time, yet no one has ticked off driving their own car as an alternative to the TTC which seems to skew the results…or maybe the primary TTC user is one who doesn’t have a car and is forced to use the system… So tell your older friends and family and those with cars who also use the TTC to take this survey!

What lucky duck gets to their destination in less than 30 minutes, or even more amazing, less than 10?! There’s only one destination I can do that in, otherwise not a hope. Sigh.

Who can afford a 25¢ fare increase? I’d like their income, if you don’t mind! If these are assumed to be all college and high school students, how do they get that kind of increase in income/allowance/grant to cover that bigger fare? That’s a hefty percentage increase to swallow on top of the already high fares. That would be 50¢ more for just one return trip.

Interesting that the biggest choices for where to raise taxes have to do with cars. Some may interpret that as because the survey takers don’t have cars, so these tax increases would not affect them. One could also interpret it as having the TTC’s competition, for users and for road space, pay for it.

Not one Wheel-Trans user has taken the survey. Given that it has real issues, it’s a shame those users either don’t know about or cannot take this survey. If you know a Wheel-Trans user, encourage them to take this survey. It’s fast and is a chance to get their voice heard!

4 Comments so far

  1. Eric S. Smith (unregistered) on September 8th, 2007 @ 9:55 am

    Who can afford a 25¢ fare increase? I’d like their income, if you don’t mind!

    Well, assuming that their income is from regular, full-time work and that they commute by transit, the fare increase works out to $2.50 per week for them. That’s 6¼¢ per working hour, or in the neighbourhood of $11 per month. Unless they’re already haggling over dented tuna cans, they can afford the fare increase.

    If these are assumed to be all college and high school students…

    “The under-34 crowd” are all high-school students, now? Even if they were, they’d be paying the reduced student fare, so perhaps they’re assuming that the increase would be less than 25¢ for them.


  2. talk talk talk (unregistered) on September 8th, 2007 @ 10:04 am

    Um, not everyone has good-paying full-time work, as the Ontario Liberals are belatedly acknowledging with their new election promises. There are an awful lot of TTC users who have no income, part-time income, on disability, and yes, my dear, 25 cents per ticket IS a big deal for those who have NO alternatives at all (not everyone can walk instead or have a car to use). Or are you saying only people with regular, full-time work are entitled to use the system and the rest of us can go hang?

    You need to read the comments on the survey site and the criticisms levelled at the survey takers before misreading what I wrote, which was NOT “all high school students.” But even if, as the critics assume, many of the under-34 crowd taking the survey are high school students, then the high school crowd may be assuming 25 cents translates to less than that for them or they may assume for them its 25 cents and thus more for adults. It’s hard to tell.


  3. Eric S. Smith (unregistered) on September 8th, 2007 @ 12:30 pm

    Or are you saying only people with regular, full-time work are entitled to use the system and the rest of us can go hang?

    You were the one asking “Who can afford a 25¢ fare increase?” as though the rhetorical answer were “nobody” or “the enviably well off” when in fact it’s “people with incomes that aren’t scandalously low.”I don’t mean to imply that an increased fare wouldn’t be a burden on many, and it seems clear to me that getting an equivalent amount of money out of the income tax base would be less harmful.I do mean to say that people who could, strictly speaking, afford 25¢ extra per transit trip aren’t rare.


  4. talk talk talk (unregistered) on September 8th, 2007 @ 12:43 pm

    Thank you for the link (very useful!) and the explanation! I get your point now, and I agree totally that “getting an equivalent amount of money out of the income tax base would be less harmful.”



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