Some Jobs More Important Than Others

Something New at the TTC! New Token Makes Official Debut

Howard Moscoe 22 March 2006:

“It’s in the long-term interest of all public-transit systems in this country to ensure that we retain a facility for constructing subway cars in this country. If the TTC doesn’t buy this order, who would?”

Moscoe 25 November 2006:

“I want to make my cars where it benefits Canadian workers. I am not going to allow millions and millions of dollars to flip out of the country just because Siemens, a German company, wants to make our cars in China.”

Moscoe 17 November 2006:

“We have minted a token that will be significantly harder to counterfeit; it’ll be a bi-metal token.” This bimetal token, like the current tokens, will be manufactured by American workers. The TTC has struck a deal to mint 20 million new tokens with the US firm of Osborne Coinage of Cincinnati, Ohio, the result being that $1.7 million will flip out of Canada and no Canadian worker will benefit from the TTC’s largesse. Gotta love our TTC Chair; he’s always thinking about the little guy.

4 Comments so far

  1. swoononeone (unregistered) on November 25th, 2006 @ 4:02 pm

    New tokens manufactured in the US. Not too big a deal. At least Bombardier scored the BIG contract. The only “suspect” thing some people have been on about regarding the new token is that they have something to protect from counterfeit – A tracking chip or ???

    Interestingly enough the big token scan was perpetrated by a group from the US smuggling in US made TTC tokens which cost the system $10M!

    http://transit.toronto.on.ca/archives/data/200602110835.shtml

    Anything that reduces the drag on paying customers is a good thing. If a US company can make the tokens better/cheaper fine. If a Canadian one is the industry leader as far as subway and train cars why not choose them…


  2. swoononeone (unregistered) on November 25th, 2006 @ 5:01 pm

    My Moscoe peeve was the idea that we should spend multi-millions to replace the subway operators. As cool as a massive toy train system would be, um not the best use of the TTC budget. At about $750-million would implement the technology into the current system, allowing subway cars to detect and adjust their speed we should wait a few months for the faster processor and new OS…LoL


  3. talk talk talk (unregistered) on November 25th, 2006 @ 5:31 pm

    LOL @faster processor.

    “Interestingly enough the big token scan was perpetrated by a group from the US smuggling in US made TTC tokens which cost the system $10M!”

    Is that why they’re suing the US mint that made the old tokens?

    What irks me most is how fast and loose Moscoe seems to play with our cash. He spends millions more than apparently we need to, to keep jobs in Canada; then he spends another almost 2 million outside of the country, cause suddenly Canadian jobs aren’t that important and what’s another million or two anyway he says we can’t afford a new subway line, then he says let’s spend that kind of money making our trains driverless, this when the TTC is squealing poverty. It makes my head spin!

    Well, actually one other thing irks me about him. He says service is important and he wants to listen to the riders, but his actions are all about making it harder to afford a token (fare increase when the province gave the city money not to raise fares) and making it more of a chore to use the system, what with not getting a seat in the middle of the day, waiting 10″ for the triplets to arrive, whether streetcar, bus, or subway, etc. etc. I think I’d better go have a drink, my BP is rising!!! LOL!!!


  4. Mark Dowling (unregistered) on November 26th, 2006 @ 11:25 am

    Advances in tokens are driven by casinos which benefits transit operators. Perhaps Moscoe should be getting together with Vancouver and Montreal as well as First Nations casino operators and OLGC to create a Canadian token maker.



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